The Value of CDL Training In Colorado

Many drivers do not see the difference between driving a personal vehicle and a commercial vehicle. No matter how experienced you are when it comes to driving your personal vehicle, you can never be prepared enough to be driving a commercial truck. Hence, it is always a good idea to get enrolled in a commercial driving school. There are a lot of CDL testing based lessons that are offered in places like Colorado where you can gain the advantage of obtaining a CDL Permit.

As far as the reasons are concerned, a commercial driving school will not only help you with a CDL but will also improve the chances of your employment. You will notice a drastic difference between applying for a job without a Class A CDL or Class B CDL and applying for a job with a CDL Permit. Your training covers all aspects of your job description in the specific field, thus guaranteeing your future potential employers that you might be the best pick for the job. Now isn’t that what everyone wants when applying for a job? To have the benefit of being chosen over other candidates in some way?

What it covers:

Learning from truck schools will teach you in depth about the job that you are choosing for yourself. You will have theoretical classes on how to handle your fleet and you will be given practical guidance on handling a different variety of fleets. A commercial driving school will offer a variety of training sessions like bus training and semi-truck training.

These are some things that cannot be obtained on your own. Even if you do have first-hand experience in driving a variety of commercial vehicles,

As an added benefit, it also shows how much you care about the specific field as you have gone to greater measures in improving your bio.

Truck schools will teach you how to drive your fleet according to the kind of merchandise that you will be managing and will also give you an idea about handling each one of them in a unique way. These on road experiences will make it easier for you in the long run when you are working for a firm. Similarly, learning from a commercial driving school will also help you be prepared for any issues on the road and give you inputs on how to tackle them. On the whole, if you have chosen to excel in truck driving, then a CDL is more of an investment for your career.

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Hours of Service

Who Must Comply?

Most drivers must follow the HOS Regulations if they drive a commercial motor vehicle, or CMV.

In general, a CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business and is involved in interstate commerce and fits any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more

  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more

  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation

  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation

  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Hours of Service Final Rule for Truck Drivers

The Hours of Service of Drivers Final Rule was published in the Federal Register on December 27, 2011. The effective date of the Final Rule was February 27, 2012, and the compliance date of remaining provisions was July 1, 2013.

 

NOTICE: The Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act of 2015 was enacted on December 16, 2014, suspending enforcement of requirements for use of the 34-hour restart. Enforcement of these requirements will remain suspended until the Secretary submits the CMV Driver Restart Study final report to Congress. For more information, see FMCSA’s Federal Register notice: www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/hours-service/hours-service-drivers.

The Meat Behind the FMCSA’s Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse

A few weeks ago, the Federal Motor Carrier Administration (FMCSA) announced it is establishing the Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse (Clearinghouse).

This new database will contain information pertaining to violations of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) controlled substances (drug) and alcohol testing program for holders of commercial drivers licenses (CLDs).

The Clearinghouse rule requires FMCSA-regulated employers, Medical Review Officers (MROs), Substance Abuse Professionals (SAPs), consortia/third party administrators (C/TPAs), and other service agents to report to the Clearinghouse information related to violations of the drug and alcohol regulations in 49 Code of Federal Regulations, parts 40 and 382 by current and prospective employees.

The Clearinghouse will also require the following:

  • Employers will be required to query the Clearinghouse for current and prospective employees’ drug and alcohol violations before permitting those employees to operate a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) on public roads.
  • Employers will be required to annually query the Clearinghouse for each driver they currently employ.
  • State driver licensing agencies will be required to query the Clearinghouse whenever a CDL is issued, renewed, transferred or upgraded.

The Clearinghouse will provide FMCSA and employers the necessary tools to identify drivers who are prohibited from operating a CMV based on DOT drug and alcohol program violations and ensure that such drivers receive the required evaluation and treatment before operating a CMV on public roads.

Specifically, information maintained in the Clearinghouse will enable employers to identify drivers who commit a drug or alcohol program violation while working for one employer, but who fail to subsequently inform another employer (as required by current regulations).

Records of drug and alcohol program violations will remain in the Clearinghouse for five years, or until the driver has completed the return-to-duty process, whichever is later.

In 2012, Congress directed the Secretary of Transportation to establish a national Clearinghouse containing CMV operators’ violations of FMCSA’s drug and alcohol testing program in Section 32402 of the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21). This rule implements that mandate and also responds to earlier recommendations of the National Transportation Safety Board.

This information collection supports the DOT Strategic Goal of Safety by ensuring that drivers are qualified to operate trucks and buses on our nation’s highways.

THE REGULATORY LANDSCAPE WIDENS

RECENT REGULATIONS IN EFFECT

SELF-CERTIFICATION: January 30, 2014 Effective Date Background: As of Jan. 30, 2014, all commercial driver license (CDL) holders in the U.S. must self-certify (formally disclose) to the State Licensing Agency (DMV) what type of work he or she does, using one of the following four categories:

•  Non-Excepted Interstate: Driver is engaged in RECENT REGULATIONS IN EFFECT SELF-CERTIFICATION: January 30, 2014 Effective Date Background: As of Jan. 30, 2014, all commercial driver license (CDL) holders in the U.S. must self-certify (formally disclose) to the State Licensing Agency (DMV) what type of work he or she does, using one of the following four categories:

• Non-Excepted Interstate: Driver is engaged in interstate commerce and must meet the federal Department of Transportation (DOT) medical card requirements

• Excepted Interstate: Driver is engaged in interstate commerce and does not have to meet the DOT medical card requirements • Non-Excepted Intrastate: Driver is engaged in intrastate commerce and must meet state driver qualification requirements

• Excepted Intrastate: Driver is engaged in intrastate commerce and does not have to meet the DOT medical card requirements Drivers who work in interstate commerce will also need to provide a medical certification (DOT physical) to prove they are qualified to drive. Failure to present valid medical documentation will result in the denial of the issuance or renewal of the CDL.

Impact: Any driver who is not currently self-certified or fails to bring their newest medical certification to the DMV will have his or her CDL downgraded to non-CDL status, putting them out of commission until resolved.

COMMERCIAL DRIVERS LICENSE REQUIREMENTS FOR MILITARY PERSONNEL:

Final rule published October 12, 2016 Background: In recognition of the truck driver training received while serving our country, the federal government is looking to ease the transition of military members into civilian careers by reducing onerous paperwork and simplifying the licensing process.

The proposal includes:

• Extending the time period for applying for a skills test waiver from 90 days to 1 year for   recently separated military

• Requires states to accept the military commercial vehicle license of certain military   personnel in exchange for a CDL

• Allowing active duty military members to apply for their Commercial Learner’s Permit   (CLP) or CDL in their current state of residence with the CLP or CDL being issued by  their state of domicile

Impact: This process has been placed in a temporary exemption since 2014, and the final rule  made it permanent.

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