The FMCSA Doesn’t Have Anyone with Trucking Experience

Truckers have been frustrated for a very long time by the laws that govern their industry as this affects how they are paid, how they work, and how employers can treat them. A news report recently revealed what many truckers had suspected for a very long time – no one in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has any experience of trucking. In fact, none of the top administrators at the FMCSA have even held a commercial driver’s license (CDL).

The news has only increased the frustrations of truckers who now know that those making the laws for their industry can’t relate with them on any level. The report stated that not even one of the top four administrators of the FMCSA had ever qualified for a CDL. This means that they haven’t even driven a semi-truck. They are the same individuals who get paid to modify and create the laws and regulations that all the 1.8 million professional truckers in American must follow.

Top Administrators Have No Trucking Experience

The report further states that Mr. Martinez doesn’t have any trucking experience, but the shocking thing was that no administrator in the entire history of the FMCSA has ever driven a truck professionally or ever held a CDL. This news is clearly disconcerting because there are a lot of different laws that harshly treat truckers and they want to be represented by people who know what they are doing.

The trucking industry is an unforgiving one. There are a lot of sacrifices that truckers must make on a regular basis. The long hours on the road and driving in all sorts of weather conditions tend to take its toll on truckers. It’s important that the laws governing their industry are in their favor. The news report highlighted the fact that this is something extremely strange because most federal agencies have leadership with experience in the field they are regulating.

For instance, it was pointed out that the acting administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration had served in the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Air Force Reserve and had 16 years of experience working as a commercial airline pilot. A lot of truckers feel aggrieved that the top administrators in the FMCSA don’t have any kind of hands-on experience in the industry that they are responsible for regulating. Most of the truck drivers in the United States feel that the people making the rules don’t have any kind of deep understanding regarding the daily realities affecting truckers. Therefore, they are unable to make rules that are fair and effective and, most importantly, in the best interests of truckers.

The feeling that they are under-represented is one that has sparked several trucking groups to take action and start fighting for the seat at the top. There are numerous groups that have started acting, and one of the most famous ones is the ‘Black Smoke Matters.’ This group is fighting to give truckers a voice in the modification and creation of trucking laws.

Safety and Sustainability: Truckers Need to Take the Initiative to Become Better Drivers

When it comes to the trucking industry, there are three top challenges that need to be resolved as soon as possible for the betterment of not just the drivers but also the whole industry. These include the following:

  • Improving driver safety
  • Compliance with the company’s policies regarding eco-friendly driving services
  • Greater fuel efficiency

Here, it is pertinent to note that all of these challenges are essentially inter-related and can be resolved simultaneously, provided that the drivers and their fleet managers take the initiative.  

Changes Regarding Driver Behavior

Stubbornness is widely considered to be the biggest obstacle when it comes to overall fleet safety, fuel efficiency, and sustainability initiatives.

This unwillingness to change is not just restricted to drivers, but also their fleet managers who have been following the same procedure and do not want to evolve. However, training truck drivers to practice safe driving techniques can result in fewer accidents, decreased emissions, and also reduced fuel consumption.  Basically, any well conducted safe driving program allows a trucking company to leverage constrained resources and also reduce their liability exposure. This is made possible by lowering the actual incidence of highly preventable accidents.

A standard best practice involves merging both eco-driving and safe-driving methods into a single program. If the driver does not have a ‘heavy foot’’ it will decrease fuel conception and the probability of high speed crashes.  Slow and sure drivers will be more aware of their surroundings and require less fuel to get from point A to point B. Thus, simply by limiting fast acceleration and sudden braking, it is possible to increase the safety and sustainability of any trucking operation.

Apart from that, pre-planning trips carefully can also help to minimize ‘stop and go’ driving, thereby leading to reduced emissions. Always remember that higher volumes of emission tend to occur whenever a cold diesel engine is started.  If you were to combine multiple short trips into one, then the truck’s catalytic converter would already be heated enough to ensure optimal emission rates.

Curbing Driver Distractions

It has been estimated that driver distraction typically accounts for approximately 25 to 30 percent of all truck accidents. However eco-safe driving techniques can easily teach drivers to avoid distractions while remaining focused on their driving skills. Additionally, the department for Environment, Health & Safety (EHS) is now increasingly involved in fleet safety affairs. This is largely due to the fact that truck drivers are now considered to be amongst the largest sources of ‘Worker Compensation’ claims.

Conclusion

Safe driving habits, if practiced diligently enough, can contribute quite substantially to reduced emissions and fuel consumption. This is where a well-developed, eco-safe driving program can also allow a company to leverage its constrained resources to ensure sustainability, fuel efficiency as well as safety.

 

Truck Rollover Prevention Tips

The truck driving industry has always been an industry focused around safety first, but are truck drivers truly educated on how to prevent one of the major hazards of truck driving: rollovers?

The Statistics

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 60 percent of rollover accidents are fatal. There are over 500 large truck rollover accidents, and over 1,300 tanker rollover accidents each year in the United States.

Historically, it was assumed that rollovers most likely occurred during turns and on ramps, but this has been unfounded. Statistically, the highest occurrences of rollover truck accidents are actually on dry straight roads and highways.

It’s also been shown that over 63 percent of these rollover accidents are with partial loads.

Common Causes for Truck Rollover Accidents

Most vehicle accidents come down to the driver, driving conditions, and condition of the vehicle.

Some of the factors behind truck rollovers are:

  • Gravity

Large trucks, particularly those hauling loads that are constantly shifting while the vehicle is moving, are more susceptible to gravity taking its toll. Once this happens, the stability of the truck can come under stress.

Also, partial loads can be more dangerous than full loads, simply because they’re more prone to shift while the vehicle is moving.

This can also happen with sudden stops and turns. The load that’s being transported can shift easily causing a rollover accident. This is why it’s important to recognize the power of gravity, and slow down when turning and maneuvering a commercial truck vehicle.

  • Speeding

This is where driver error comes in. Speeding and distracted driving are major no-nos on the road in any type of vehicle, but particularly large commercial trucks carrying loads. This is why large trucks are expected to drive lower speeds in order to be careful in varying driving conditions.

Close-call situations while on the road can happen at any time, so it’s important for truck drivers to pay attention to speed limit signs.

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, 78 percent of rollover accidents are due to driver error.

  • Bad Weather

Bad weather is an inevitable evil all drivers face. Yet when it comes to driving a large commercial truck, bad weather can be extremely dangerous in certain circumstances. This is why it’s important that drivers are properly trained.

For any kind of vehicle, icy roads, snow, fog, and high winds can result in a rollover accident. For a truck driver, it takes specialized training, common sense, and experience to know how to safely deal with inclement weather conditions.

Truck Rollover Prevention

Organizations such as the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration have created training footage to equip cargo truck drivers with knowledge on how to prevent rollover accidents.

Some of the key things for drivers to remember are, firstly, always being alert of what’s going on with their vehicle. It’s important for truck drivers to be alert while driving and understanding the kind of load they’re transporting.

Another thing drivers should always do is make sure their truck is operating properly in general. This includes tires, brakes, and suspensions.

And lastly, remain educated! Understand how rollovers happen, and avoid circumstances where they could happen. Ultimately, an educated driver is a safe driver.

Colorado Job Opportunities for CDL Holders

Colorado is a state with a great number of opportunities for those looking to obtain a commercial drivers license (CDL). According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the mean annual salary for Colorado truck drivers in 2017 was $42,480 per year. This is higher than the national average of $39,500 per year, and is expected to increase.

As of 2016, there were 1,871,700 heavy, tractor-trailer, and light, delivery driver truck jobs. Though there is no work experience in a related occupation to become a truck driver, drivers are expected to have a high school diploma and graduate from a professional truck driving school.

In 2013, the state of Colorado alone provided 99,590 truck driver jobs. The wages that year was more than $4.8 billion, with the average salary at a high $48,114, or approximately $4,000 a month.

Job growth in Colorado is higher than the national average. A reported 25 percent increase in truck driving jobs in the state is expected by the year 2022. Colorado reportedly has over 12,660 trucking companies, many of which are small businesses.

With all this in mind, it’s understated that Colorado takes CDL training seriously. Because trucks are a major asset to moving goods around the state (according to the Colorado Motor Carriers Association, a reported 79 percent of Colorado communities depend on trucks for goods transportation), the state has invested in its schooling system to train would-be truck drivers.

Our CDL training school, Commercial Vehicle Training Center, not only prepare our students to begin truck driving immediately after completion of our CDL program, but also provide job assistance.

Truck Driving Job Opportunities in Colorado

There are many large companies offering opportunities to CDL holders. Many job listings can be found through association with Colorado trucking organizations, such as the Colorado Motor Carriers Association. Affiliation with an organization can provide valuable networking opportunities and early job search info.

Here are just a few of the top companies ready to hire Colorado CDL school graduates.

J.B. Hunt

J.B. Hunt is a household name for good reason: it’s one of the largest transportation companies in the US. Currently, the company has close to 125,000 employees, and are looking to add more. The average yearly gross pay for drivers is $70,000, and the company offers competitive benefits, matched 401K, and various driving opportunities for Colorado truck employees, from local to regional.

Beco Inc.

Beco Inc. is a highly-respected trucking company in Colorado, historically known for its decades of delivery service for the United States Postal Service. This family-owned trucking company gives drivers the option to be at home with their family as often as they like. On average, their drivers are home every three days. They offer a competitive benefits package, which includes dental, vision, 401K, and paid holidays and vacations.

Fleet Car Carriers

Based in Commerce, Colorado, Fleet Car Carriers’ fleet consists of 615 trucks and drivers. This company specializes in full truckload auto shipments, with local, regional, and national routes. FCC also boasts being the recipient of the 2017 General Motors Quality Carrier of the Year Award.

FCC is an owner-operated company, which also allows drivers to drive new vehicle models from the top automotive companies. Salaries for drivers vary, but worker reviews for the company are generally high.

CDL Training: A Career Move You Should Consider

Choosing to get a commercial driver’s license is one major decision, but deciding which one happens to
be another. There are several classes of CDL licenses you can choose from. We highly recommend that
whichever license you choose, that it fits your career goals and lifestyle. This takes planning.

What are the three CDL classifications?

There are three classes of CDLs: Class A, Class B, and Class C.

Class A CDL:

A Class A CDL is required to operate any vehicle with a weight of 26,001 lbs. or more. This can include
flatbeds, tanker-trailers, livestock carriers, and the like.
Generally, those with a Class A license are allowed to drive vehicles in the other two classes, if they have
the right endorsements.

Class B CDL:

According to the Department of Motor Vehicles, a Class B CDL is required to operate “A single vehicle
with a GVWR of 26,001 lbs. or heavier and/or any vehicle as described above that is towing another
vehicle weighing up to 10,000 lbs.”
This can include school buses, delivery trucks, tour buses, city buses (such as garbage trucks), etc.

Class C CDL:

If your vehicle is meant to transport hazardous materials or doesn’t meet the criteria for a Class A or
Class B license, it more-than-likely falls into the classification of a Class C. Class C criteria is also meant
for vehicles transporting 16 or more people, including the driver.

Generally, Class C is normally required for smaller truck vehicles.

The benefits of obtaining a Class B CDL

Let’s face it, most people love the idea of traveling to unfamiliar places and checking out the unique
scenery during long road trips — but if you have a family you’d like to see on a regular basis, while still
having the benefits of operating a large vehicle, then training for a Class B CDL is right up your alley.
With a Class B license, you have the opportunity of becoming a well-paid truck driver, while still coming
home every night. There’s also one of the biggest draws of obtaining this type of license: options.

Class B drivers have the option of focusing on being a tow truck driver, school bus driver, garbage truck
driver, construction site driver, and more. This license allows you to explore whatever industry you’re
interested in. There’s almost always a regular need for good drivers in this class.

Also, it’s easier to train in driving a bus than it is an 18-wheeler.

What’re the requirements for obtaining a Class B CDL?

The main things you’ll need is to be 21 years and over, with a good driving record. That’s the foundation.
You’ll have to take the Department of Transportation’s physical and drug screening, and it’s important
to find a good training school. Our training center can help prepare you for your exams.
Our Class B course is over within a week, giving you ample time to learn what you need to successfully
pass your exam and take your career to another level. Our goal is to help you get on the road as safely
and soon as possible.

Ultimately, the flexibility of training for and having a Class B license is a win-win. We highly recommend
you consider it.

CDL Training: Defensive Driving

Are your driver’s really the best drivers on our roads? Most truckers would agree that’s true…until their first accident.

Mastery of the road requires a solid foundation in Defensive Driving. The ability to anticipate and prepare for dangerous situations in advance translates to fewer accidents and increased revenue. The Commercial Vehicle Training Center offers an intensive Defensive Driving Course that exceeds the basic mechanics of driving, giving your drivers the edge they need to assess threats, adverse conditions, and emergencies.

Schedule your Defensive Driving Course today.

Bus and Limo Driver’s

Bus Drivers must have a Commercial Driver License if they operate a vehicle designed to seat 16 or more persons, including the driver. The Commercial Vehicle Training Center trains Entry Level Bus Drivers and we offer specific training for your existing professional drivers.

As a licensed 3rd party testing facility for Colorado, CVTC can administer the Commercial Driver License Test for bus drivers and Limo driver’s..

Corporate Courses

OUR SAFETY TRAINING AND DRIVER EVALUATIONS COVER A VARIETY OF TOPICS

The Commercial vehicle Training Center provides safety courses to evaluate your driver’s abilities in every situation. We offer a proactive approach geared to boost your CSA  scores, and retrain drivers who have a repeated history of safety related problems and offenses.

Our safety training and evaluations cover a variety of topics, which can be purchased in segments depending on the specific needs of your drivers and company. CVTC offers group training and evaluations for several employees or one on one training for individuals seeking a safety skills evaluation. Making safety training as convenient as possible, we can schedule our instructional staff to come on site to your place of business or your employees are welcome to come to CVTC’s campus and receive their training.

“I wanna quit!”

Yes it’s easy to say, not so easy to do sometime’s. Especially if it’s not in your drive, your culture, your future. I’ve heard it a few time’s in this business’ the CDL training business. It’s sad, but I get it. Big truck, hard to shift, hard to back and term’s you have never ever heard of before. What the heck is a glad-hand? someone that is happy to shake your hand? or a slack adjuster, what’s that? a Marine Drill Sergeant in boot-camp? lot’s of strange stuff involved with a CDL.
But quitting? it come’s up. The one thing is, these guy’s and gals don’t want to quit, they don’t want you to quit them either. We all have heard it all. “I’ll never get this, shifting is to hard I don’t understand it. I cant back up, Ill never get it.” Here they come, into your office, or into the practice yard with that look. What are you going to do? What are you going to say?
I listen, I tell them I get it. Then I tell them to get right back out there and do it again. I also tell them I’m not letting them quit and we walk right back out the door together and head right back to the truck. 99.9% time I’m right on. Yesterday, the gentlemen you see in this picture passed his CDL Skills test. I had that talk with him 2 weeks ago. Yesterday, he told me I saved his life, you see he live’s in Houston and left right after the Hurricane. He left with only his car and some clothe’s. He has a job lined up and should be in driver orientation for a big carrier on Monday. See I know I didn’t save his life, he did. I just didn’t let him quit his life. WE just need to listen.

Navigating the New Electronic Logbooks

Starting in October, the way you log your time will look and feel completely different. The days of manually writing down your time are coming to an end.

Last October, a major hurdle in the way of making electronic logging devices (ELDs) mandated on all commercial transportation trucks in the U.S. was cleared.

While the debate on mandating ELDs on every truck is not a done deal, it is predicted to be passed in congress over the next few months.

If you’re a driver or owner of a transportation trucking company, there are some things about the coming logging changes you need to know:

1. What is the deadline for having ELD installed on my truck?

According to the proposed plan, trucks drivers and truck owners will need to purchase an ELDs and install it on their truck by December 2017. Trucks already equipped with an automatic on-board recording devices (AOBRDs) will be permitted to continuing to use the AOBRDs for two years after the December deadline.

2. What if I get a new truck after the December deadline?

If you’re simply replacing a truck that has an AOBRD, you can simply install the old AOBRD into the new truck. If the old truck didn’t have an AOBRD, a new one can be purchased and installed on the new truck before December 18, 2017. A new truck purchased after December 18,2017 will need to have the new electronic logging device bought and installed.

3. How hard is it to switch from AOBRD to ELD?

The transition will be easy and quick as it only requires a simple software upgrade.

4. What are some of the biggest changes to be aware of?

The new ELD system will bring some significant changes in how hours are logged. The most noticeable changes will include:

    • Drivers having more control of the hours by making drivers the ones to edit and approve hours
    • Hours when an unassigned vehicle moves such as moving a truck across the lot will need to be counted
    • The ELD system will be available to be synched with a smartphone and tablet

5.   How do you choose the right ELD provider?

There will be multiple companies jumping at the opportunity to manufacture and supply the new ELDs. It is important to make your decision wisely.

When looking for an ELD provider, look for these characteristics:

  • Stability
  • Are financially able to exists for years into the future
  • Has a record of making electronic logs
  • Ask how many devices from the manufacturer are being used in your business
  • Manufacture products that are in compliance
  • They are up-to-date on their devices and technology
  • The company understands any unusual operations your company has, such as odd business operations

6.     How do you choose the device that’s right for your fleet?

There are multiple ELDs out there, some of which may or may not be best suited for your specific fleet. When looking for an ELD to invest in, consider which specific features your fleet needs beyond the electronic logs, the operational thresholds of the ELD units, the operating system and other software components.

Also consider how the ELDs will integrate into both your trucks and back office, the units interface, and how the device will ultimately add value to your company.

7.   What is the best way to train drivers for the new system?

There is a large learning curve, especially for drivers used to the paper logbooks. There should be a short lag time between teaching drivers and having them use the system.

The training needs to include normal use, special use, requesting/making edits, common problems (and solutions), what to do if the device fails, and setting the device up for roadside inspection. The training should involve live training using an actual device.

8.   How will the new system be enforced on the road?

Drivers will need to transfer data from the ELD to the enforcement officials upon request. There will be two main ways to do this: use an email or wireless web service to transfer data from the ELD to the enforcement officials or transfer the data from ELD to the enforcement official via Bluetooth or USB.

In addition, the driver must either give a printout of the log on the ELD to the official or hand the officer the ELD display.

9.   What if the ELD system breaks?

The driver can resort to the manual written logging of hours if the ELD system breaks or malfunctions. The ELD needs to be repaired or replaced within 8 days.

10.  How will the new system affect productivity?

As with the roll-out of any major change, there will be initial productivity loss. Some carriers have noticed an increase in productivity.

Transitioning from the traditional paper hours logs to electronic logging can be a challenge for veteran drivers.

Those looking to start their truck driving careers will be taught how to operate the new ELD units during their schooling and licensing process.

If you want to be a part of the changing truck driving field, look no further than Commercial Vehicle Training Center.

Our seasoned, expert instructors give students some of the best hands-on instruction in the country. Contact us today to learn more about our reputable truck driving training program and how we can help you get started on your truck driving career.

Turn Signals, Is it just a Fad?

You’ve seen it, maybe even done it. Not use your turn signal, you know that little lever on the side of your steering wheel that goes up or down. The one that makes that God-awful noise when you do happen to push it up or down when you’re making a turn. And the annoying little light that blinks in your dash, how much energy does that take away from your car or truck anyway? I wonder how much the car or truck manufacturers could save the consumers if they just stopped making them? Heck, most people don’t use them anyway, especially right here in Colorado. Did you know that the Society of Automotive Engineers did a study and conceded that failure to use the stupid things resulted in twice the number of accidents that are cause by distracted driving? What the?  and in all they are not used 750 BILLION times a year.

Now imagine if all tractor trailers stopped using them, just like cars and trucks. Could you imagine the carnage that would take place on the nation’s highways and roads? What’s really, sad is when I see a trucker not use his turn signals. Truckers are supposed to be professional drivers, especially after all the time and effort we spend harping on the use of them in training school. It’s the same thing that goes through my head, do we not care about anybody but ourselves? My wife and kids are on those roads, your wife, and kids, his wife and kids. And it really is a simple process. Here, lets cover it in a few simple steps. Notice that you have to make a turn soon, remember in driver’s ed the rule was 200 feet you should use your turn signals to warn other driver’s that you may be turning. Push the turn signal lever, or raise it depending on which way your turning. Make your turn after you notice it’s safe to do so. See, it’ really is a simple process. But, you’re going to have to put your CELL PHONE DOWN TO DO IT!

Inspeccion Pre-Viaje Guia De Estudio

AAC– Abrasiones, Abolladuras, Cortes (plastico, goma)  | DRA Doblado, Roto, Agrietado (metal)  | Sin Fugas (Aire, liquido) Use guantes y toque cada parte que inspeccione. Inspeccione desde arriba hacia abajo y hacia el centro)

Hay 5 áreas para inspeccionar durante la parte de pre-viaje de la prueba de destrezas de CDL:

  1. Compartimiento del motor
  2. Lado y parte posterior del camión
  3. Conexiones y Trailer
  4. Chequeo de luces externas
  5. Inspección dentro de la cabina

Nota: esta guía de estudio no puede usarse durante la Prueba de Destrezas CDL.

Compartimiento del Motor

Comience al frente del camión con estas 3 (Fugas, Inclinación, y Luces):

  • Asegúrese de que no haya fugas de fluido bajo el motor
  • Asegúrese de que el vehículo no esté inclinado hacia un lado (Baja presión de los neumáticos o problemas de suspensión defectuosos)
  • Asegúrese de que todas las luces de la parte delantera sean del color apropiado, montadas firmemente, sin grietas o sucio, y no tiene humedad dentro de la lente.

Abra el capó. Grite ‘despejado’ cuando lo haga. Inspeccione el motor usando estas formula: 3 fluidos, 3 componentes, correas y mangueras. Refigerante–A nivel apropiado, sin fugas, montado de forma segura, sin doblar, roto o agrietado; verifique las mangueras si estan separadas o cortadas, y montadas de forma segura.

Fluido de Dirección Asistida–A nivel apropiado, sin fugas, montado de forma segura, no DRA; verifique las mangueras si estan separadas o cortadas, y montadas de forma segura.

Aceite–Inidique donde se encuentra la varilla de nivel y que el aceite esté en el nivel adecuado.

Alternador–No puede estar DRA y debe estar montado de forma segura; cables montados de manera segura y sin desgastes. Correa o engranaje, la correa no debe ser mas de 1/2″ a 3/4″ de juego y sin daños. Bomba de agua-montada con seguridad, sin DRA; Sin fugas, correa o engranaje conducido; Si la correa, no tiene más de 1/2 “a 3/4” pulgada de juego y no tiene ninguna división o cortes; Busque la bomba de agua siguiendo la tubería grande desde la parte inferior del radiador. Compresor de aire-sin DRA y debe estar bien montado; No hay fugas audibles y el cinturón o engranaje conducido. Si el cinturón, la correa no tiene más de 1/2 “a 3/4” pulgada de juego y no tiene cortes o cortes. El eje de dirección no tiene juego excesivo (2 “), sin DRA, montado de forma segura, las juntas en U no esten DRA y están correctamente engrasadas. Caja de dirección – sin DRA, ninguna filtración, montado con seguridad, todo el hardware presente, ningunos faltantes.

Brazo Pitman -sin DRA, firmemente montado, todo el hardware en su lugar, sin que falte alguno. Las tuercas de castillo sin DRA y clavijas en su lugar. Biela de arrastre-sin DRA, montado de forma segura, todo el hardware en su lugar no faltan. Casquillo de tuerca sin DRA y trinquete en su lugar. Bujes de goma sin AAC y correctamente engrasado.

Montajes de resorte – los soportes de resorte no tienen DRA, montados de forma segura en el bastidor. Todo el hardware presente, ninguno faltante.

Suspensión en ballesta-sin DRA, firmemente montado, no separación. Pernos en U-sin DRA, firmemente montado, ningún metal brillante. Amortiguador-sin DRA, montado de forma segura, sin fugas, todo el hardware presente, bujes de goma sin abrasiones, moretones o cortes. Manguera de freno-manguera a cámara de freno no dividida o cortada, sin fugas audibles, montadas de forma segura.

Cámara de frenos – sin DRA montado de forma segura, sin fugas audibles, todo el hardware en el lugar no faltan.

Ajustador de varillaje-sin DRA, firmemente montado, sin pernos faltantes, varilla no tiene más de 1 “de juego y está en un ángulo de 90 ° a la cámara.

Tambor de freno-sin DRA, montado de forma segura, no azul de calor. Pastillas de freno – sin DRA, montado de forma segura, mínimo 1/4 “de almohadilla

Rueda (interior) – sin DRA, montado de forma segura, sin soldaduras ilegales, el cordón no está dañado.

Gomas-Lado no tiene AAC; La profundidad de la banda de rodadura es de 4/32 “min., Uniformemente desgastada, inflación de control con calibre de aire, no vuelve a pisar los bueyes.

Rueda (exterior) – sin DRA montado firmemente, ninguna soldadura ilegal, perla no está dañada.

Válvula de vástago sin DRA, montado de forma segura, sin fugas, tapa de metal.

Tuercas de rueda-sin DRA, montado de forma segura, sin senderos de óxido o spidering, ninguno desaparecido.

Sello de Buje-sin DRA, montado de forma segura, sin fugas, hardware en lugar no suelto; Dígale al probador cómo verificar el nivel de aceite.

Lado y parte posterior del Camión

La segunda inspección es el lado y la parte posterior del camión. Esta inspección también tiene un flujo para ayudarle a recordar todo lo que necesita inspeccionar. Recuerda tocar o apunta todo lo que estes inspeccionando. Comienza con el espejo del lado del conductor. Espejo: montado firmemente, sin DRA, todo el hardware en el lugar ningunos faltantes.

Puerta: montada de forma segura, sin DRA, se abre y se cierra, las bisagras montadas de forma segura, sin DRA, junta de goma montado de forma segura, sin AAC.

Escalones-montados de forma segura, sin DRA, no excesivamente sucios. Tanque de combustible-montado de forma segura, sin DRA, sin fugas, la tapa esté apretada.

Escape-montado firmemente, sin DRA, ninguna evidencia de fugas (hollín exterior).

Pasarela y Escalones-montados de forma segura, sin DRA no excesivamente sucio;

Marco-Montaje seguro, sin DRA, sin soldaduras ilegales.

Eje de transmisión – montado de forma segura, sin DRA, juntas en U bien montadas, sin DRA debidamente engrasadas, sin residuos.

Luces traseras-color apropiado, firmemente montado, no agrietado o sucio, ninguna humedad dentro del lente.

Espacio-suficiente espacio entre la parte trasera del camión y el tren de aterrizaje para las vueltas.

Guardabarros–montado de forma segura, sin DRA, todo el hardware en el lugar que no falte ninguno; Fachada de barro no se divide ni se corta.

Suspensión de ejes, frenos, ruedas, neumáticos:

Montajes de resorte – los montajes y el hardware de los resortes no esten DRA y que esten montados firmemente al marco.

Suspensión en ballesta-sin DRA , firmemente montado, no separación. (No hay muelles de láminas Inspeccione la barra de torsión o brazo oscilante: sin

DRA y montado de forma segura.)

Pernos en U-sin DRA , firmemente montado, sin metal brillante, tuercas en lugar sin DRA

Amortiguador-sin DRA , montado de forma segura, sin fugas, todo el hardware presente, bujes de goma sin AAC.

Bolsas de aire: las bolsas no se dividen o cortan, no hay fugas audibles, montadas de forma segura, sin DRA , todo el hardware en el lugar no faltan. Frenos-manguera a la cámara de frenos sin AAC, sin fugas audibles, montado de forma segura.

Cámara de frenos – sin DRA , montado de forma segura, sin fugas audibles, todos los accesorios en el lugar no faltan.

Ajustador de varillaje – sin DRA firmemente montado, ningunos pernos faltantes, la varilla de empuje no tiene más 1 “del juego y está en el ángulo de 90 ° a la cámara.

Tambor de freno-sin DRA , montado de forma segura, no azul de calor. Pastillas de freno-sin DRA , montado de forma segura, mínimo 1/4 “de almohadilla.

Rueda interior-sin DRA , montado de forma segura, sin soldaduras ilegales, el talón no está dañado.

Gomas lado-no tiene AAC’s; La profundidad de la banda de rodadura es de 2/32 “min., Uniformemente desgastada, la comprobación con el medidor de aire, se puede volver a pisar, no hay objetos extraños entre los neumáticos, no hay hueco entre las ruedas.

Rueda exterior-sin DRA , montado de forma segura, sin soldaduras ilegales, el talón no está dañado.

Válvula de vástago sin DRA , montado de forma segura, sin fugas, tapa de metal.

Tuercas de rueda-sin DRA , montado de forma segura, sin senderos de óxido o spidering, ninguno desaparecido.

Sello de Buje-sin DRA , montado de forma segura, sin fugas, hardware en lugar no suelto; Revise el nivel de aceite con el dedo (no lo intente). Inspeccione el último eje para ser consistente.

Conexiones y Remolque

Comience con las CONEXIONES. Comience en la parte posterior del camión y trabaje hacia la quinta rueda.

Aire / conexiones eléctricas del camión y remolque-las conexiones deben estar bien montadas, sin DRA, no hay fugas; Asegúrese de que el cierre de seguridad sea operativo y sin DRA.

Mangueras, sin AAC, las líneas no están enredadas o arrastrando en el paseo del gato.

Protectores: asegúrese de que la carcasa no tenga DRA y verifique que no haya fugas. Caja eléctrica montada de forma segura, sin DRA, no falta hardware.

Ensamblaje de la quinta Rueda es la conexión física. Comience en la parte superior y trabajar su camino hacia abajo al inspeccionar. Delantal: el delantal no puede tener DRA y debe estar bien montado; Asegúrese de que no haya espacio entre el faldón y la placa de deslizamiento y que estén correctamente engrasados.

La placa de deslizamiento está bien montada, sin DRA, el pivote y la clavija en su lugar, sin DRA.

Manija de liberación – montada firmemente, sin DRA, en la posición bloqueada. Barras de deslizamiento montadas de forma segura, sin DRA, pasadores de bloqueo están en su lugar, sin DRA; Manguera de aire sin fugas, montada de forma segura.

Plataforma de seguridad montada en el marco, sin DRA, todo el hardware está en su lugar y sin DRA.

Perno – montado firmemente, sin DRA, engrasado correctamente. Las mordazas de bloqueo están alrededor del pivote, no estén DRA, engrasadas apropiadamente.

Las luces delanteras de remolque-luces de despeje son de color adecuado, montadas de forma segura, no agrietadas o sucias, no hay humedad en el interior de la lente. Cabecero sin DRA.

Lado del remolque-sin DRA, ningunos agujeros, todos los remaches en lugar. La cinta DOT está bien montada, no sucia, cubre por lo menos el 50% del lado. Marco no estén DRA, montado de forma segura. Los miembros transversales están montados de forma segura, sin DRA; El piso no tiene agujeros, montados de forma segura. Equipo de aterrizaje sin DRA, montado de forma segura; Manejar sin DRA, firmemente montado, y operacional; Luz montada firmemente, color apropiado, no agrietado o sucio, la junta no tiene AAC; Mangueras debajo están bien montadas, sin AAC, no arrastrando en el suelo, sin fugas; Tobogán en tándem sin DRA, montado de forma segura, clavijas en su lugar, sin DRA; El brazo de liberación sin DRA, montado de forma segura y en posición bloqueada; El fango se eleva firmemente, no estén DRA, y el tiempo suficiente; Luz ABS no agrietada o rota, no sucia.

La parte trasera del remolque-luces de despeje de color apropiado, no agrietado o sucio, ninguna humedad dentro del lente; Las bisagras están bien montadas, sin DRA; Puertas sin DRA, ningunos agujeros; Sello de puerta intacto, sin daños, montado de forma segura; Manijas y varillas de las puertas sin DRA, montado con seguridad, operacional; Las luces son de color adecuado, firmemente montado, no agrietado o sucio, no hay humedad dentro de la lente; La cinta del DOT se monta firmemente, no sucia, cubre el 100% de la parte posterior; Parachoques está montado de forma segura, sin DRA.

Suspensión de ejes, frenos, ruedas, neumáticos.

Montajes de resorte – los montajes y el hardware de la primavera no sean DRA, montados firmemente al marco.

Hoja de muelles-sin DRA, firmemente montado, sin tijeras. Inspeccione la barra de torsión o el brazo oscilante: sin DRA y montado de forma segura. Pernos en U-sin DRA, montado con seguridad, sin metal brillante, las tuercas en lugar sin DRA.

Absorbedor de choque-sin DRA, firmemente montado, sin fugas, todo el hardware presente, bujes de goma no tienen AAC.

Bolsas de aire-bolsas no divididas o cortadas, sin fugas audibles, montadas de forma segura, sin DRA; Todo el hardware en su lugar, ninguno falta. Frenos-manguera a cámara de freno no dividida o cortada, sin fugas audibles, montadas de forma segura.

Cámara de frenos – sin DRA, montado de forma segura, sin fugas audibles, todo el hardware en su lugar, ninguno que falte.

Ajustador de holgura – sin DRA firmemente montado, ningunos pernos faltantes, la varilla de empuje no tiene más 1 “del juego y está en el ángulo de 90 ° a la cámara.

Tambor de freno-sin DRA, montado de forma segura, no azul de calor. Pastillas de freno-sin DRA, montado de forma segura, mínimo 1/4 “de almohadilla.

Rueda interior-sin DRA, montado de forma segura, sin soldaduras ilegales, el talón no está dañado.

Lado de la rueda no tiene AAC’s; La profundidad de la banda de rodadura es de 2/32 “min., Uniformemente desgastada, la comprobación con el medidor de aire, se puede volver a pisar, no hay objetos extraños entre los neumáticos, no hay hueco entre las ruedas.

Rueda exterior-sin DRA, montado de forma segura, sin soldaduras ilegales, el talón no está dañado.

Válvula El vástago sin DRA, montado firmemente, debe tener una tapa de metal. Pernos de rueda -sin DRA, montado de forma segura, sin senderos de óxido o spidering, ninguno desaparecido.

Sello de Buje-sin DRA, montado de forma segura, sin fugas, hardware en lugar no suelto; Dígale al probador cómo verificar el nivel de aceite. Esta inspección debe terminar en el sello del cubo. Revision Luz Externa

La revision de luz externa ocurre con el estudiante en el camión y el probador afuera. El probador comienza en la parte delantera del camión. El estudiante llama a las luces que se van a comprobar y el probador verifica que las luces están funcionando. El estudiante mueve el probador alrededor del vehículo, de un lado a la vez. Hay 26 luces para comprobar. Comience encendiendo todas las luces.

Frente del camion: luces de despeje, luces de camiones, faros, luces altas, señal de giro a la izquierda, señal de giro a la derecha y farolas de 4 vías.  Lado izquierdo del camión, luz de despeje, luz de giro a la izquierda, intermitente de 4 vías.

Parte trasera del camion: luces traseras, luces de freno, señal de giro a la izquierda, señal de giro a la derecha, farolas de 4 vías.  Lado derecho del camion:  luces de despeje, luz de giro a la derecha, intermitente de 4 vías.

Frente del remolque: luces de despeje.

Lado izquierdo del remolque luces de despeje, señal de giro a la izquierda, intermitente de 4 vías.

Parte posterior del remolque: luces de despeje, luces traseras, luces de freno, señal de giro a la izquierda, señal de giro a la derecha y farolas de 4 vías.

Lado derecho del remolque, luz de despeje, luz de giro a la derecha, intermitente de 4 vías.

 Inspección de Cabina y Frenos

La inspección en la cabina comienza con 5 elementos de seguridad y termina con una prueba de freno de aire.

Cinturón de seguridad montado, la correa no tiene cortes o deshilachos, se ajusta adecuadamente, y se engancha y se desengancha. (Dejalo atado).  Extintor de incendios-debidamente cargado y clasificado, montado de forma segura, pin en su lugar.

3 Triángulos – montados de forma segura, sin DRA, ninguno desaparecido. Fusibles: deben tener fusibles de repuesto o disyuntores; Si el vehículo no usa fusibles, mencione al examinador.

Cuernos: asegúrese de que los dos cuernos estén operativos. Después de inspeccionar sus artículos de seguridad, encienda y continúe con su inspección.  Espejos y parabrisas bien montados, no rotos o agrietados, limpios, sin pegatinas ilegales, espejos adecuadamente ajustados.

Limpiaparabrisas-brazos montados de forma segura, sin DRA, cuchillas no tienen divisiones o cortes, w / w fluido está en funcionamiento.  El calentador / descongelador-demostrar que ambos están operativos.  Luces indicadoras del tablero (encender luces encendidas) luces altas, luces de giro a la derecha e izquierda, luces intermitentes de 4 vías.

Inicio seguro- (decir al probador todos los 4 de estos pasos antes de realizar!) El freno de estacionamiento está ajustado, la transmisión en punto muerto, y el embrague está presionado. Arrancar el motor y buscar la luz ABS para encenderse y luego ir off. Con el vehículo puesto en marcha, revise los indicadores.  Indicador de aceite: operativo, subiendo a (o en) el rango de funcionamiento adecuado, sin luz de advertencia.

Indicador de temperatura – operacional, subiendo a (o at) el rango de funcionamiento adecuado, sin luz de aviso.

Voltímetro-operacional, subiendo a (o en) el rango de funcionamiento adecuado, sin luz de advertencia.

Indicadores de aire (2) – operativos, subiendo a (o en) el rango de funcionamiento adecuado, sin luz de advertencia.

Chequeo de Freno Comience por comprobar el freno de estacionamiento. Para ello, el motor debe estar en marcha. (Explique cada paso antes de realizarlos.) Freno de estacionamiento: suelte el freno del remolque (presione la VÁLVULA ROJA), tire ligeramente contra él.

Freno de servicio: (pedal de freno) suelte el freno de estacionamiento (las dos válvulas deben estar ENTRADAS), tire hacia adelante a 5 mph, presione el embrague y el pedal del freno mientras agarra ligeramente el volante; Compruebe si el vehículo tira hacia la izquierda o hacia la derecha.

Deje el camión en el engranaje y las válvulas empujadas adentro. Apague el motor, pero la llave en ENCENDIDO (indicadores!) Para los 3 pasos siguientes. (LOS PRÓXIMOS 3 PASOS DEBEN SER EFECTUADOS para evitar un fallo automático en el pre-viaje).

Prueba aplicada: presione y sostenga el pedal del freno, los medidores de aire no pueden perder más de 4psi en 1 minuto (3psi para la Clase B).  Prueba de ventilación (advertencia de aire bajo): pedal del freno del ventilador hasta que el medidor de aire indique ~ 60 psi en cuyo punto debe encenderse una luz de emergencia de bajo aire y / o un zumbador;  Frenos de emergencia de suspensión (pop-out): continúe abanando los frenos hasta 40-20 psi, momento en el que las válvulas de freno deben salir. Mira las válvulas, no el medidor de aire. ¡No hay neumático de las válvulas! Nota: si olvidó activar la tecla durante los últimos 3 pasos, informe al probador. Luego empiece de nuevo con la Prueba Aplicada.

La Inspección en Cabina es una serie de 5: 5 Artículos de Seguridad

5 Elementos del tablero de instrumentos

(Inicio seguro) 5 indicadores

5 pasos de prueba de freno